Leading from Behind to Address the Affordable Housing Crisis and Homelessness

This post is second of a two part-series focused on philanthropy’s role in ending homelessness in collaboration with Funders Together to End Homelessness. It originally appeared on The Center for Effective Philanthropy on April 4, 2019.

The affordable housing crisis isn’t new. It isn’t even an “emerging” crisis. Our country has been in the midst of it for decades and neighbors in our communities who are living in poverty are suffering the most from its effects, putting them at risk of experiencing homelessness.

As we embark on the next Presidential election cycle, we are hearing more and more from candidates about affordable housing, or the lack therefore of, and how states across the country are grappling with how to best address it. For those of us working in the homelessness field, this isn’t revolutionary. We’ve been yelling that the sky is falling for years, and we are finally starting to see momentum in both public and political will to give this issue the attention it needs.

The housing and homelessness sector has some of the most passionate and driven advocates. And because of their tireless work advocating for better policies and much needed federal funding, as well as implementing programs that center families and individuals who are most vulnerable, the harmful consequences of this situation, while still at emergency status, have been mitigated. But this work must continue full speed ahead — and then some — if we are to truly end this crisis.

This is where philanthropy is needed. If we are dedicated to providing access to safe and affordable housing to all and ending homelessness, philanthropy must step up to the plate and lead from behind to be part of the solution.

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All Funders Should Care about Housing and Homelessness

The lack of affordable housing cannot and should not only be a concern to housing and homelessness funders.

If you fund health, you need to be funding housing. Studies have shown that health outcomes are linked to stable, safe, and affordable housing. Funders like Kaiser Permanente understand this link and are taking action by providing $3 million to address affordable housing and homelessness.

Is education part of your grantmaking portfolio? Then you should be engaging in work on housing. Students who experience homelessness or are at risk of housing instability are more likely than their non-homeless peers to be held back from grade to grade, have poor attendance or be chronically absent from school, have more disciplinary issues, and drop out of school.

Funders prioritizing workforce development need to be thinking about its intersection with affordable housing. Without employment, housing stability is at risk. And without dependable housing, it is near impossible to retain employment.

Are you a funder committed to reforming the criminal justice system? The success of criminal justice reform could result in a new homelessness problem, as returning citizens continue to face barriers to accessing housing.

Without access to safe and affordable housing, all other aspects of life become increasingly difficult for individuals to manage, let alone to sustain the ability to thrive.  It is the underlying issue to many other problems and challenges individuals and families face. And only once stable housing has been established can we begin to successfully address the other challenges. Funders working on all systems and issues areas must make housing a priority in their grantmaking and focus on upstream solutions to prevent homelessness and housing insecurity.

Racial Equity at the Forefront

If we are talking about housing or homelessness and not also prioritizing talking about racial equity, we are setting ourselves up to fail at our mission.  Because of structural racism, both current and historical, people of color disproportionally experience homelessness. In fact, black people account for more than 40 percent of people experiencing homelessness despite comprising only 13 percent of the total U.S. population. And this is by no accident.

Racism in the housing system is rooted deep in our nation’s history and was perpetuated through redlining and mortgage discrimination. Decades later, the effects from these actions are evident today and have created vast disparities within housing, which have an impact across all sectors (think: health, education, employment…sound familiar?). If we don’t think about naming and correcting these disparities at the systems level, we will never touch the surface of meeting housing needs and ending homelessness.

Philanthropy must understand that it isn’t enough to just claim that racial equity is important. Rather, it must implement a commitment to racial equity by centering it and ensuring all grantmaking is done through a racial equity lens. We’ve been encouraged by the energy from both philanthropy and national partners that are naming racial equity as a priority. But it is important to remember that racial equity shouldn’t just be another issue that we add to our plates. Instead, it should be at the center of all issue areas.

Philanthropy’s Responsibility to Act

Philanthropy’s role in this work cannot be overstated and its responsibility cannot be ignored. It is vital for funders to lead from behind and support efforts to address the affordable housing crisis and end homelessness.

Fund what works and innovate. When it comes to homelessness, we know what works. Evidence-based solutions such as Housing First models including rapid re-housing and permanent supportive housing have been proven to both prevent and end homelessness. Funders can invest in these solutions and increase the resources to build capacity for stronger and more robust programs. Likewise, philanthropy must also be bold in its investments. By funding innovative interventions, philanthropy gives communities the flexibility to take risks and prove what can work so those interventions can then be brought to scale.

Collaborate. Funders that collaborate together and build partnerships through public and private relationships provide a critical backbone to this work. This collaboration, both within philanthropy and together with the public sector, can support and ensure that efforts to build strong and sustainable programs throughout communities positively influence and effectively create systems change. To scale impact, funders must build public-private partnerships and leverage public dollars.

Engage in advocacy and policy work. Systems change is multi-faceted and, at its core, happens through enhanced policies that affect the issues we most care about. As funders, many times we are under the impression that engaging in this work isn’t for us. But this couldn’t be further from the truth. Funders can educate public officials on what is working in communities, write op-eds to inform the public, and support grantees to build capacity for grassroots organizing. Philanthropy has a unique voice that should be used to push and influence.  Engaging in policy and advocacy work can make all the difference between moving the needle and staying with the status quo.

Center those with lived experience. The true experts in this space are those who have lived experience. Their expertise informs us of what is working and where there are gaps in programs. So why are these individuals not included as part of the solution? As funders, we should ensure that folks with lived experience have a permanent seat at the decision-making table because without their voice, all our best efforts will fall short.  Are we and our grantees giving up power and funding in a way that trusts historically marginalized communities to develop solutions to housing stability that is not rooted in dominant white culture?

Do it all with a racial equity lens. Yes, all. We have largely funded systems and services based on an equality lens. But we haven’t acknowledged the structural and historical racism that will necessitate investing in what people need to ensure race does not determine outcomes, reestablish past inequities, and shift funding to feel more like justice. Not only should funders be sure all grantmaking has a racial equity lens, but they must also do the work internally to examine the organizational structure and acknowledge the white dominant culture philanthropy works within. We cannot expect our grantees to do to this work without putting ourselves under the microscope and making a commitment to addressing equity at our foundations first.

Amanda Andere is the CEO of Funders Together to End Homelessness. She has spent over fifteen years working in the nonprofit and public sector as a leader committed to racial equity, social justice, and housing affordability through advocacy for systemic change. Follow her on Twitter at @AmandaAndere.

 

Change Starts with Sisterhood…

Growing up, I was always the kid to sign up for free after school activities and events. I loved getting the chance to meet new people, try hands-on activities, and build lasting friendships. Unfortunately, as I grew older, there became fewer free or low cost after school programs for me to attend in my community. My freshman year of high school became bleak. My family couldn’t afford to put me in sports or music classes because the cost of the equipment was too high. My sister, Kelly, informed me of an opportunity at the Smithsonian. They were offering a paid internship for high school students at the National Museum of Natural History. Much to my surprise, after submitting my application and completing my in person interview, I was selected. That year has to this day been one of the most impactful periods of my life. Being surrounded by young kids of color who had similar backgrounds like mine made me realize that we all had the potential to be successful in any field regardless of what mainstream media had told us. My time at the Smithsonian showed me how important mentorship, STEM education, and safe spaces are for young kids of color.

My self confidence in applying to other programs skyrocketed after my time at  the Smithsonian. I became part of Girls Who Code’s DC summer immersion program, Hackathons, Harvard’s MCC Youth Council, and the HerLead fellowship program. I realized that the reason I kept coming back and applying to new programs was because I loved being in spaces that allowed kids in marginalized communities feel like they had boundless potential, and were surrounded by mentors who provided them with guidance and support. I created Your Girl for Good as a HerLead Fellow during my Junior year of High School. I realized that the main reason why kids oftentimes do not consider a career in STEM, art, or politics is because they lack diversity. I wanted to give kids the opportunity that I was fortunate enough to have while at the same time tailoring it specific to young girls of color in the DC area. Your Girl for Good’s mission is to provide our participants with hands on activities and workshops led by successful women of color in STEM, Art, and Political sectors. We held our first Summer Mentorship Program in Columbia Heights in the summer of 2017 and partnered with the ACLU, Emily’s List, the NIH, the Smithsonian, and other local DC area organizations. Even now, our former participants have remained in contact with their mentors from our first program. One of our summer mentorship program participants, Farhana, met her mentor through Your Girl for Good who later wrote her her college letter of recommendation and they remain close to this day. 

Your Girl For Good team members Stephanie Villanueva-Villar, Shams Ibrahim Hamid, Iman Yousfi
Your Girl For Good team members Stephanie Villanueva-Villar, Shams Ibrahim Hamid, Iman Yousfi

In 2018, the Your Girl for Good team and I were invited to attend Washington Area Women’s Foundation’s GirlsLEAD Summit. The day was filled with diverse and prominent speakers, interactive workshops, and lectures focused on different topics that impact communities of color. While scrambling with excitement from classroom to classroom, trying to make our next activity on time, we came across a flyer mentioning that the WAWF was going to be launching their Rock Star Fund for local DC area women and girls who wanted to create change in their community. It felt like fate when holding that flyer for the first time. For so long we wanted to create our own series of Your Girl for Good summits throughout DC. We applied later that year and were selected to be part of the inaugural class of Rock Star Grantees. 

The experience couldn’t have been better, the team at Washington Area’s Women Foundation has stood by us every step of the way to make sure that our Grant project went smoothly. My team members and I got to meet the other awardees and hear about the important work that they’re doing to help their communities in DC. The BluePrint for Action that we were provided with has tremendously helped Your Girl for Good incorporate important data and advocacy methods into our programs moving forward.

YWAC Alum join 'Your Girl For Good' founders
YWAC Fellows join Your Girl For Good team members Shams Ibrahim Hamid & Iman Yousfi

With the help and guidance from Claudia Williams and Martine Gordon, our Rock Star Fund project went amazing! Young girls of color across DC gathered at the Public Welfare Foundation to have an open and honest discussion about the importance of mental health and building healthy relationships through our partnerships with SMYAL and Planned Parenthood. Through our painting and vision board making workshops, we were able to get our participants to focus on their personal aspirations and self-reflect. Our Art & Mental Health summit was a perfect way to end the summer as students return to school later this month. We here at Your Girl for Good are so excited for what’s to come. We know that the future is brighter and stronger when people and organizations stand behind and support  young women of color.

Boycotting the Census is not the Answer #CountDMVIn

Last Thursday, the Census 2020 working group we are part of organized a conference for Grantee Partners and non-profit organizations serving hard-to-count populations. Participants had the opportunity to network and connect with members of the Complete Count Committee of their jurisdiction, brainstorm strategies to count vulnerable populations, and learn about the consequences an inaccurate count will have on the distribution of federal funds the next ten years.

We kicked-off the day with a keynote speech by Vanita Gupta, President and CEO of The Leadership Conference on Civil & Human Rights. In her remarks, Ms. Gupta talked about the unprecedented challenges and threats to accuracy the 2020 Census is facing. A last minute introduction of a citizenship question—still being contested—will make the population harder to count, but so too will major demographic changes over the past decade, a lack of predictable funding, and changes in the process that have not been tested adequately.

She assured attendees now is the time to get involved, to identify and engage trusted messengers in the community, and to spread the word about the importance of a fair count. While she acknowledged that the concerns of immigrant communities are very real, she also warned that boycotting the census is not the answer. It would only reinforce a concerted effort to construct a whiter electorate, diminishing diverse communities’ political voice and shared funding. For immigrant communities, participating in the census is about not being invisible. It is a way to say, “I am here, I count.” Ms. Gupta ended her statement making a call to philanthropy to join the effort and to invest in building capacity to engage in census outreach in community organizations that serve populations at risk of underrepresentation.

The Census 2020 working group is aware that funder engagement in support of the census is more important than ever. It is creating a space for funders to learn, strategize, and plan investments together and is actively creating resources and opportunities for grantee partners and non-profit organizations in our region to encourage participation among their staff, clients, families, and communities.

To keep the momentum going the working group wrapped-up the conference by opening a request for proposals for the fund Count DMV In, which will support projects related to outreach, education, and direct assistance focused on hard to count communities. It also released a set of fact sheets with information on basics you need to know about the census next year, including a timeline, ways you can help, and data on census tracks at risk of undercounting in each jurisdiction of the greater Washington region.

We all have a role to play in the 2020 Census. Whether you can commit to a sustained effort or can spare only a couple hours, you can participate in multiple ways—starting today. All hands on deck!

Here are three ways to get involved:

  • Follow @CensusCounts and spread the word about how the census is easy, safe, and important. Use the hashtag #CountDMVIn to raise awareness about the importance of an accurate count in our region.
  • Convene workshops and webinars to develop solutions to Census 2020 challenges in your community, to share resources and information, and to receive important updates.
  • Join the Census 2020 working group or consider investing directly or with other foundations and donors through CountDMVIn—a pooled fund housed at the Greater Washington Community Foundation dedicated to Census 2020.

Claudia Williams is Program Officer at Washington Area Women’s Foundation where she contributes to crafting and executing program strategy and manages the Young Women’s Initiative of Washington, DC

New Report: Family Planning Community Needs Assessment

New Report: ‘Family Planning Community Needs Assessment’ for the

DC Family Planning Project (DCFPP)

The George Washington University Milken Institute School of Public Health (GW), with support from The Alexander and Margaret Stewart Trust and Washington Area Women’s Foundation, conducted a community needs assessment for the DC Family Planning Project (DCFPP) aimed at providing an in-depth analysis of the family planning landscape for women aged 15–29 in DC. This comprehensive community assessment, which includes both primary and secondary data, was designed, implemented, and analyzed between July 2017 and May 2018.

Nationwide, the rate of unintended pregnancy, defined as those pregnancies that are mistimed or unwanted, is one of the highest in the developed world. Although the unintended pregnancy rate has been declining nationally and locally in recent years in the general population, disparities remain – particularly in the District of Columbia. Poor and low-income women continue to bear the brunt of this disparity.

Access to family planning services, including both privately and publicly funded services is one necessary component to reducing unintended pregnancies, and more importantly, to ensuring women and families in DC have the ability to plan if and when to have a child. At The Women’s Foundation, we won’t rest until all women, especially young women and girls of color, have equal access to economic security, safety and opportunity, which is why the Family Planning Community Needs Assessment report is important.

The report identifies gaps, barriers, and facilitators to family planning services and contraceptive utilization in DC. There are several key findings from this study that provide insights for both service delivery sites as well as for direct outreach to the community, including the following:

  • a disconnect between availability of contraceptive services and utilization of these services;
  • limited availability of adolescent-friendly services;
  • widespread confidentiality concerns regarding adolescent reproductive health services;
  • a significant number of sexually active adolescents and young women in DC who are not accessing
    reproductive health care at all;
  • low levels of knowledge of Long Acting Reversible Contraceptive (LARC) methods (which include
    intrauterine devices (IUDs) and implants), particularly amongst 15–19 year-olds, non-Hispanic black
    adolescents/women and adolescents/women living in Wards 4, 5, 7 and 8; and
  • negative perceptions and concerns about the safety, side effects, and comfort of LARC methods,
    which influence many women’s decisions regarding contraceptive methods.

The DCFPP, housed at The Women’s Foundation, will use the results of this needs assessment, along with the input of the DCFPP Community Advisory Board to develop interventions to reduce reproductive health disparities and improve reproductive health outcomes in DC.

To find out more, click here to read the full report!

#our100days Day 41

Justice For All and For Her

According to the Federal Bureau of Prisons, as of January 2017, 6.7 percent of all inmates are women. Despite the seemingly small percentage, women are the fastest-growing group of inmates. Many justice-involved women have experienced trauma during their lifetimes, however, jails and prisons offer little or no trauma-informed care or mental health services.

Here’s what we’re doing today:

Vera’s 2016 report, Overlooked: Women and Jails in an Era of Reform, which focuses on women in jails on a national level, is comprehensive, fact-based, and offers concrete insights to what honestly happens to women in jails in this country. It also offers substantive ways of changing the system and reducing the number of justice-involved women. The report proves that women who are in jail are suffering because of ignorance and gender bias.

Sample Tweets:

Women are the fastest-growing group of inmates. Read & share @VeraInstitute’s report wawf.org/2lV7qqI #our100days

Did you know women are the fastest-growing group of inmates? @TaylarNuevelle discusses it in her article wawf.org/2lAolw9 #our100days

 

Highlights from The Women’s Foundation’s Analysis of 2015 Poverty Data

Our analysis of the newly released data from the American Community Survey found women’s poverty rates during 2015 continue to be substantially above the poverty rates for men; that among women, single women with children and women of color are more likely to live below the poverty threshold; and that poverty rates vary considerably across jurisdictions. The Washington Region faces some of the largest disparities in women’s poverty in the United States.

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  • Poverty rates have fluctuated with the economy, but no substantial long-term progress has been made across the region overall or in any particular jurisdiction.
  • The percent of women and girls living in poverty in our region decreased in every jurisdiction during 2015 except in Montgomery County. Overall, the poverty rate for women and girls in the region went from 10.6 percent in 2014 to 10 percent last year.
  • The poverty rate for men and boys in 2015, 8.1 percent, also diminished from 8.3 percent in 2014.
  • Women’s poverty rate in the District of Columbia (18.4 percent) is by far the highest poverty rate for women and girls among the jurisdictions that comprise the Washington region.
  • Prince George’s County (10.4 percent) and the City of Alexandria (9.7 percent) have the highest poverty rates for women after the District of Columbia. Women living in Fairfax County (6.7 percent) are the least likely to be poor.
  • Women’s poverty has been steadily increasing in Montgomery County for most of the past decade. With the exception of 2011, women’s poverty has increased year after year, while men’s poverty has decreased several times since 2010.
  • Female-headed households with children reached a poverty rate of 26.6 percent while only 3.2 percent of married-couple families in a comparable group lived below poverty across the region. In the District of Columbia the poverty rate for female-headed households was 40.3 percent. The lowest rate was 14.2 percent in Arlington County.
  • Of families with children living in poverty in the Washington Region, 66.8 percent were headed by single women. The jurisdictions with the largest share of poor families headed by single women were the District of Columbia (82.5 percent) and Alexandria (75.4 percent).
  • About 15.1 percent of Black women and 14.7 percent of Latinas in the region lived below the poverty level, a considerably higher rate than the 4.9 percent for White, non-Hispanic women.
  • The District of Columbia has the largest concentration of Black women in poverty (27.9 percent) while Prince George’s County has the largest concentration of White (7.8 percent) and Latina women in poverty (19.7 percent).

The Women’s Foundation is committed to building pathways out of poverty for women and girls across our region. As we work to achieve our mission, we recognize the value of having the most updated data on the status of women and girls in our community at our fingertips. We constantly analyze and disaggregate survey data to shed light on the issues that impact the program areas we direct our grant investments. We hope this knowledge becomes a valuable resource to our Grantee Partners and organizations that share our mission to help support a woman’s journey to economic security.

 

Highlights from The Women’s Foundation’s Analysis of 2014 Poverty Data

Our latest detailed analysis on women’s poverty (available in a series of fact sheets on our website!) found women’s poverty rates continue to be substantially above the poverty rates for men; that among women, single women with children and women of color are more likely to live below the poverty threshold; and that poverty rates vary considerably across jurisdictions. The Washington Region faces some of the largest disparities in women’s poverty in the United States.

WAWF Poverty Rates

  • Poverty rates have fluctuated with the economy, but no substantial long-term progress has been made across the region overall or in any particular jurisdiction.
  • The percent of women and girls living in poverty in our region is at its highest point since 2005, increasing from 8.8 percent in that year to 10.6 percent in 2014.
  • The poverty rate for men and boys in 2014, 8.3 percent, was lower than for women and girls and has remained steady since 2010.
  • Women’s poverty rate in the District of Columbia (19.2 percent) is by far the highest poverty rate for women and girls among the jurisdictions that comprise the Washington region—almost twice as large as the average poverty rate for women across the region (10.6 percent).
  • Women’s poverty has been steadily increasing in Montgomery County for the past nine years. With the exception of 2011, women’s poverty has increased year after year, while men’s poverty has decreased several times since 2010.
  • Female-headed households with children reached a poverty rate of 25.1 percent while only four percent of married-couple families in a comparable group lived below poverty across the region. In the District of Columbia the poverty rate for female-headed households was 38.5 percent. The lowest rate was 17.6 percent in Prince George’s County.
  • Of families with children living in poverty in the Washington Region, 63.3 percent were headed by single women. The largest share of these families was concentrated in the District of Columbia (81.5 percent) and Alexandria (63.6 percent).
  • About 15.0 percent of Black women and 13.2 percent of Latinas in the region lived below the poverty level, a considerably higher rate than the 5.2 percent for White, non-Hispanic women.
  • The District of Columbia has the largest concentration of Black women in poverty (27.3 percent) while Prince George’s County has the largest concentration of White (9.2 percent) and Latina women in poverty (20.5 percent).

The Women’s Foundation is committed to building pathways out of poverty for women and girls across our region. As we work to achieve our mission, we recognize the value of having the most updated data on the status of women and girls in our community at our fingertips. We constantly analyze and disaggregate survey data to shed light on the issues that impact the program areas we direct our grant investments. We hope this knowledge becomes a valuable resource to our Grantee Partners and organizations that share our mission to help support a woman’s journey to economic security.

Women’s Poverty on the Rise

The Women’s Foundation is committed to building pathways out of poverty for women and girls across our region. As we work to achieve our mission, we recognize the value of having the most updated data on the status of women and girls in our community at our fingertips. We constantly analyze and disaggregate survey data to shed light on the issues that impact the program areas we direct our grant investments. This knowledge enables us to be better positioned to invest in programs and strategies that effectively support a woman’s journey to economic security.

Our latest analysis on women’s poverty (available in a series of fact sheets on our website!) reveals a discouraging but well-known story for those of us interested in the issue. Years into the economic recovery and poverty rates are still on the rise for women. The number of women living in poverty in our region increased once again—from 10.2 percent in 2013 to 10.6 percent in 2014. While women’s poverty rates continues to rise, the poverty rate for men in our region has remained steady at 8.3 percent since 2010.

PoveTrend

Single women with children and women of color face a higher risk of falling below the poverty threshold—$19,790 for a family of three in 2014. Currently, 25.1 percent of the female-headed households with children in our region are raising their families in poverty. Overall, about 15 percent of Black women and 13.2 percent of Latinas are struggling with economic hardship across the region as well.

There are many reasons why women fall below the poverty threshold, including unemployment, barriers to accessing education, lack of affordable childcare, and discrimination and the persistent gender wage gap. But one of the key factors is low-quality and low-income jobs. Many women in our region are working more than full-time at poverty-level wages with little to no benefits. The cost of living in the Washington region makes it nearly impossible for these women and their families to make ends meet. For instance, a family of three (one adult and two children) living below the poverty line in the District of Columbia earns only about $19,790 in a year; but, in order to meet basic needs, that same family would require an annual income of at least $85,000.

There are some key steps we can take to help women on the path to economic security, including: adopting critical policies and supports like quality, affordable early care and education; strengthening available safety net programs, and encouraging jobs with family-sustaining wages and benefits. We must also raise awareness about the needs and vulnerabilities of women with the recognition that their economic security isn’t just a “women’s issue.”

Our latest analysis on women’s poverty is an important reminder that the work we do together is crucial to our community. In collaboration with our Grantee Partners and our Donors, we are helping women access basic education, enroll in workforce development programs, get new jobs, access financial education programs and find high-quality and affordable early care and education for their children. Recognizing that gender matters, we are investing in women, and in doing so we impact entire families and communities.

Statement from Prosperity Together Regarding President Obama’s FY17 Budget

Statement from Prosperity Together Regarding President Obama’s FY17 Budget

 

Nonpartisan, National Coalition of Women’s Foundations Strongly Supports President Obama’s Budget Provisions Expanding Opportunities for Women and Working Families

 

Prosperity Together, a nonpartisan coalition of public women’s foundations from across the country announced today its support of the investments outlined in President Obama’s Budget to expand opportunity, promote equality and build economic stability for women and working families in America. These efforts include: expanding paid leave, promoting equal pay for equal work, enforcing worker protection laws, increasing the minimum wage, supporting women-owned businesses, creating pathways to high-growth jobs and ensuring access to quality, affordable healthcare, housing and early care and education.

Prosperity Together applauds the President’s continued commitment to community-based solutions that partner government with philanthropy and corporations to create pathways to economic security for low-income women in America.

 

“In our region, Washington Area Women’s Foundation serves as the only donor-supported, public foundation solely focused on improving the economic security of women and girls,” said Jennifer Lockwood-Shabat, president and CEO of Washington Area Women’s Foundation. “We commend the President’s leadership in taking a number of steps to expand opportunities for women and families, which will have positive ripple effect across entire communities. We believe that when women are strong, communities are strong.”

 

This year, Washington Area Women’s Foundation awarded $820,000 in grants to 22 local nonprofits dedicated to improving the economic security of low-income women and girls in the Washington metropolitan region. This grant docket follows the collective funding commitment of Prosperity Together and will reach more than 4,000 women and girls in the region, potentially increasing their collective assets and incomes by nearly $4.5 million over the next year alone.

 

About Prosperity Together

Prosperity Together is a nonpartisan coalition of public women’s foundations from across the country dedicated to improving the economic security of low-income women and their families. On November 13 at The White House, Prosperity Together announced a five-year, $100 million funding commitment to invest in programs and strategies that will create pathways to economic security for low-income women in America. Prosperity Together demonstrates the critical role and power of women’s foundations to drive this work in communities, state by state, across the country. For more information, click here.

 

About Washington Area Women’s Foundation

Washington Area Women’s Foundation is a DC-based public foundation dedicated to mobilizing our community to ensure that economically vulnerable women and girls in the Washington region have the resources they need to thrive. Learn more about The Women’s Foundation’s mission to transform the lives of women and girls, the Washington region, and the world by visiting us online, on Facebook or on Twitter.

 

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